For many people in Georgia, riding a motorcycle is more than a way of getting around. It’s a way of life. They love nothing more than the thrill of riding down the highway, either alone or with friends.

But for too many Georgians, their love of riding comes with a terrible price. Every year, hundreds of riders are killed in motorcycle accidents. Many of these crashes are the result of car or truck drivers acting carelessly or outright dangerously. And riders and their passengers do not always survive these encounters.

Risk of being killed in a motorcycle crash in Georgia

The data bears this out, though there is some good news. A 2019 news report stated that Georgia ranked 19th in the country in the rate of motorcycle fatalities per registered motorcyclist. That report found that 139 riders were killed in 2017.

However, that is a significant reduction from 2016, when, according to the Governors Highway Safety Administration, 170 riders and passengers died. Also, GHSA found that Georgia ranked near the bottom of all states in motorcycle deaths as a percentage of overall traffic fatalities in 2016.  Just 11.1 percent of its traffic deaths that year were riders. To compare, in South Carolina, 18.2 percent of victims in fatal accidents were motorcyclists.

The personal aftermath of a serious motorcycle wreck

While statistics like these are encouraging, we would need more recent statistics to know if it is part of a trend. Also, these numbers do not cover the more common outcomes where the rider survives the wreck but is left with a long-term or permanent disability. After a serious crash, you may be in terrible pain, or struggling with physical, mental and emotional limitations.

In Georgia, riders injured in motorcycle crashes caused by another party’s negligence have the right to seek financial restitution. To get the best possible outcome to your claim, find an experienced personal injury lawyer to represent you. Your attorney should be able to explain the process to you in plain language, and be equally effective negotiating a settlement and, if necessary, going to trial.