Georgia residents may find themselves commuting in the dark now that daylight saving time has ended. Though motorists in general only do a quarter of their driving at night, 50 percent of traffic deaths occur during this period. According to the National Safety Council, the risk for a fatal car crash triples at night. The following are just some of the factors in this trend.

The nighttime is known to compromise depth perception, color identification and peripheral vision. Plus, the glare of oncoming lights can temporarily blind drivers. Older drivers also have diminished night vision and may have trouble seeing the road even when their high-beam headlights are on.

For these reasons, drivers should ensure that their headlights are aimed correctly and that they regularly wash their windshields. If night vision is a major problem, an eye exam may be necessary. Most importantly, drivers should slow down and never engage in distracting activities while behind the wheel.

The nighttime now encompasses part of rush hour, typically from 4 p.m. to 7 p.m., so drivers should remain patient and watch out for anyone darting from lane to lane. Drug- and alcohol-impaired drivers are most frequently on the road between midnight and 3 a.m. on weekends. Therefore, late night drivers should be careful of intoxicated motorists.

Unfortunately, many drivers ignore the risks that are specific to the nighttime. When an accident arises out of such negligence, a victim can see if they have the grounds for a personal injury case. If a case is warranted, a lawyer could help the victim fight for fair compensation.